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Mali: New Ebola case confirmed, 2 more suspected

BAMAKO, Mali (AP) — Mali on Saturday confirmed a new case of Ebola and said two more suspected patients are being tested, raising concern about a further spread of the disease which has already killed at least five people in the country.

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Pope meets with autistic children

Pope Francis kisses a child as he meets with the participants at the missionary meeting of the Italian bishops' conference in the Paul VI hall at the Vatican, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis tenderly embraced children with autism spectrum disorders, some of whom avoided meeting his gaze, during an audience Saturday aimed at offering solidarity to people living with the condition.


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Mali records new Ebola case, linked to dead nurse

Children watch as a health worker sprays disinfectants outside a mosque in BamakoBAMAKO (Reuters) - Mali has recorded a new case of Ebola in the capital Bamako after the friend of a nurse who died of the hemorrhagic fever earlier this month tested positive for the disease, health and medical officials said on Saturday. The nurse contracted the disease after treating an imam from neighboring Guinea, who died after being incorrectly diagnosed with kidney problems. This allowed Ebola to spread to five other people in the West African nation's second outbreak. "Of two suspected cases tested, one was negative and the other positive. ...


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Saudi Arabia tackles MERS virus, still hunting source

By Kate Kelland LONDON, (Reuters) - (This story corrects to make clear that the finding that 97 percent of cases were hospital-acquired was from a study of an outbreak in Jeddah, paragraph 10) Saudi Arabia has not yet traced the source of a mysterious camel virus, leaving many questions about a disease that has killed 346 people in the Kingdom. ...

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UK volunteers fly to Sierra Leone to fight Ebola

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — The first wave of volunteers from Britain's National Health Service arrived in Sierra Leone Saturday amid what the World Health Organization has described as an "intense" surge in cases.

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Plague outbreak kills 40 people in Madagascar

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — A plague outbreak has killed 40 people on the island nation of Madagascar, with 119 people diagnosed with the bacterial disease since August.

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Dutch to destroy 8,000 ducks to prevent bird flu outbreak

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Dutch health authorities on Saturday were destroying 8,000 ducks to prevent the possible spread of bird flu, which has infected three farms in a week in the Netherlands, a leading poultry and egg exporter. A government statement said ducks were being culled in the central town of Barneveld as a precaution because authorities want to eliminate all risks after the H5N8 virus spread to three out of 12 provinces since last Sunday. ...

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International Ebola fight helping but more work needed -U.N. chief

United Nations Secretary-General Ban walks after speaking to the media after the UN Chief Executive Board's private session on the Ebola response in WashingtonWASHINGTON (Reuters) - International efforts to fight Ebola are helping to slow the rate of new infections in some areas but increased infections in others and fears of further contagion in Mali indicate much work is still to be done, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said on Friday. Ban said more trained medical teams are needed, especially in remote districts of countries in West Africa where more than 5,400 people have been killed by the virus. Ban said the coordinated efforts of country leaders and safer burial practices, combined with international support, are helping. ...


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Car jackers in Guinea steal suspected Ebola blood samples

CONAKRY (Reuters) - Robbers in Guinea hijacked a Red Cross vehicle this week and made off with a cooler containing blood samples from suspected Ebola patients, a senior Red Cross official said on Friday. "No doubt they thought it was something else," Youssouf Traoré, head of the Red Cross delegation in Guinea, told Reuters. He gave no further details of the attack but said the robbers would probably dump the cooler once they found it did not contain gold or diamonds. More than 5,000 people have died in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia in the worst outbreak of the Ebola virus on record.

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Plague in Madagascar has killed 40 people out of 119 cases -WHO

GENEVA (Reuters) - An outbreak of the plague has killed 40 people out of 119 confirmed cases in Madagascar since late August and there is a risk of the disease spreading rapidly in the capital, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. So far two cases and one death have been recorded in the capital Antananarivo but those figures could climb quickly due to "the city's high population density and the weakness of the healthcare system", the WHO warned. ...

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Ebola death toll rises to 5,459 - WHO

A U.N. convoy of soldiers passes a screen displaying a message on Ebola on a street in AbidjanGENEVA (Reuters) - The death toll in the Ebola epidemic has risen to 5,459 out of 15,351 cases identified in eight countries by the end of Nov. 18, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. The figures showed an increase of 39 recorded deaths and 106 new cases since those issued on Wednesday. "Transmission remains intense in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone," the WHO said, referring to the hardest-hit countries. All six known Ebola cases in Mali have now died and 327 contacts exposed to the virus are being monitored in the capital Bamako, it said.


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Letters detail thoughts of gunman killed at Florida university

Crime scene tape is seen in front of the library at Florida State University, in TallahasseeBy Bill Cotterell TALLAHASSEE Fla. (Reuters) - Authorities are investigating mailed packages linked to a gunman who shot three people before he was killed by officers at Florida State University, the FBI said on Friday. Officials said the packages were part of their investigation into why the gunman opened fire in a crowded library. Thought to have been mailed by suspected shooter Myron May before his rampage, the packages were not considered a threat to the public, said U.S. Postal Inspection Service officials. ...


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Connecticut man pleads not guilty in son's death in hot car

By Richard Weizel MILFORD Conn. (Reuters) - A Connecticut man pleaded not guilty on Friday to a charge of criminally negligent homicide in the death of his 15-month-old son, who died on a hot summer day after the father left him in the back seat of his car and went into work. The cause of the boy's death on July 7 was "hyperthermia due to environmental exposure," the chief state medical examiner's office said, ruling the death as a homicide in August. Kyle Seitz, who faces up to a year in jail if convicted, has said he forgot he had the toddler in the back seat when he arrived at his ...

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Newtown massacre shooter indulged dark obsessions online, report says

Adam Lanza is pictured in this undated handout photoBy Richard Weizel MILFORD Conn. (Reuters) - By the time Adam Lanza massacred 26 children and adults at a Connecticut school two years ago, he was living in nearly complete isolation, communicating with no one except an online network of people obsessed with mass murder, a report released on Friday said. The 20-year-old's fascination with violence, which came to a head in the December 2012 shootings at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, was already evident when Lanza was himself in grade school, according to the state's Office of the Child Advocate. ...


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Transvaginal mesh trial losses put pressure on Boston Scientific

By Jessica Dye NEW YORK (Reuters) - Boston Scientific Corp’s back-to-back losses in the first two federal trials over its transvaginal mesh devices could drive up the cost of resolving thousands of similar lawsuits, according to legal experts. On Thursday, a jury in West Virginia awarded four women $18.5 million for injuries they said were caused by the Massachusetts-based company’s Obtryx device for stress urinary incontinence, including $4 million for “gross negligence.” The verdict came one week after a Miami jury awarded $26. ...

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Judge in Colorado cinema rampage case allows second sanity exam at trial

James Holmes sits in court for an advisement hearing at the Arapahoe County Justice Center in CentennialBy Keith Coffman DENVER (Reuters) - A judge overseeing the Colorado theater massacre case rejected a defense motion on Friday to have a second sanity examination administered to accused gunman James Holmes barred from his upcoming murder trial, court records show. Holmes, 26, has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to opening fire inside a Denver-area theater during a midnight screening of the Batman film “The Dark Knight Rises” in July of 2012, killing 12 moviegoers and wounding dozens more. ...


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The Importance of Loving Your Self

I recently did an exercise in my acting class where we tapped into abundance and played with the energy that it evokes. We got to see it, visualize it, hold it and touch it. When I awoke from the trance, I had a profound experience where I realized that for the first time, I truly trust my self and honor my self -- something I know I didn't...

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Health for the Holidays? Have Fun!

Health for the Holidays? Have Fun!With this singular season of lofty ideals, crass commercialism, family gatherings, varying religious significance, aeronautical ungulates, indulgent torpor and culinary debauchery- euphemistically known as "the holidays" -- upon us, where should health figure in it?At the front of the line, I say. Have a good time!You might expect me, a...


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Ebola-related events in the United States and response

(Reuters) - Health agencies around the world are grappling with the worst Ebola epidemic since the virus was identified in 1976. The following is a chronology of events in the United States and the government's response at home and abroad from the time the World Health Organization identified the beginnings of the outbreak in early 2014 in Guinea: March 22: Guinea confirms hemorrhagic fever that killed more than 50 people is Ebola. March 30: Liberia reports two Ebola cases; suspected cases in Sierra Leone. May 26: WHO confirms first Ebola deaths in Sierra Leone. ...

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United Nations members resolve to end child marriage

By Mirjam Donath UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United Nations agreed on Friday that all members should pass and enforce laws banning child marriages, resolving to end a practice that affects about 15 million girls every year. The committee of the 193-nation General Assembly that deals with human rights adopted by consensus a resolution urging all states to take steps to end "child, early and forced marriage." There are now more than 700 million women who were married before their 18th birthday, many in conditions of poverty and insecurity, according to U.N. statistics. ...

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FDA approves Purdue's painkiller that can reduce abuse

(This version of the Nov. 20 story, corrects final paragraph to show Embeda treats pain, not opioid dependence) (Reuters)- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a long-acting narcotic painkiller with abuse-resistant properties made by Purdue Pharma L.P., the agency said on Thursday. The FDA approved the once-daily drug, Hysingla ER, with the expectation that it will reduce, though not necessarily prevent, abuse through snorting or injecting. It is the second extended-release "pure" hydrocodone drug approved by the FDA. ...

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Maintaining a firm grip differs for men and women

By Ronnie Cohen NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A simple grip-strength test might someday help doctors identify patients’ risk for potentially disabling conditions later in life, but interventions likely would differ for men and women, a new study suggests. Using data from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging, researchers found gender differences in potential reasons why men and women lose their ability to maintain a firm grip. A strong grip is helpful for activities of daily living. ...

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TSX nears two-month high on Chinese, European policy moves

By John Tilak TORONTO (Reuters) - Canada's benchmark stock index rose to its highest level in nearly two months on Friday as investors cheered a move by China to cut interest rates and signs that the European Central Bank might step up asset purchases. The surprise announcement was the first time in two years that China had cut rates, following signals that the pace of growth in the world's second-biggest economy was slowing. The move helped drive gains in the prices of commodities such as gold, copper and oil; and that pushed up shares in the mining and energy sectors. ...

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This Winter, Start Small and Be Consistent

This Winter, Start Small and Be ConsistentMost people look at adopting a fitness regimen as a life-altering event that is going to take lots of time and require major changes. We can easily imagine the results we want and the next thing you know we've entered a 12 week challenge at work or at the gym. Unfortunately, this type of thinking can be really intimidating. When we're scared we...


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‘Hypoallergenic’ labels may not be accurate

By Madeline Kennedy (Reuters Health) – Products for kids with itchy skin that are labeled hypoallergenic often contain ingredients that can cause allergic reactions, a recent study found. The “hypoallergenic” label is not regulated by the FDA, said Carsten Hamann, a medical student at the Loma Linda University School of Medicine in California and the lead researcher on the study. He and his colleagues tested products that might be used by kids with eczema, which affects 17.8 million people in the U.S., according to the National Eczema Association. ...

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How To Get The Right Man To Commit To You

How To Get The Right Man To Commit To YouI tell my husband that I am beyond grateful that I met him when I was 27 and not a day earlier. Why? Because I wasn't committed enough to myself before that in order for him to truly commit to me. Here is the deal: Unless you are truly committed to yourself (and I will talk about what that means below), nobody else can truly commit to you...


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U.S. threatens to cut food stamp funding to Maine in photo ID row

By Dave Sherwood BRUNSWICK Maine (Reuters) - The federal government has threatened to cut funding for Maine’s food stamp program, saying the state may be violating recipients' civil rights by requiring welfare cards to bear their photograph. Maine began printing photos on electronic benefit (EBT) cards in July in an effort that Republican Governor Paul LePage said was designed to combat fraud. The U.S. ...

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The Skinny on Nestl??'s New Exercise in a Bottle Project

Exercise in a bottle? Maybe someday.

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Give Thanks for Your Eyes: 7 Amazing Facts

Give Thanks for Your Eyes: 7 Amazing FactsAs Thanksgiving fast approaches, we're reminded to give thanks for the wonderful things in our lives: our loved ones, our freedom and most certainly our good health. As humans, we're extremely visual creatures, so as you look upon the joyous gathering of friends and family prior to feasting, consider taking a moment to give thanks for your...


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Two drugs found effective in treating excess potassium

By Gene Emery (Reuters Health) - Two experimental drugs can reduce dangerously high potassium levels in the blood, a problem that can plague people with diabetes and kidney disease and lead to a fatal heart rhythm, researchers say. The findings are from two separate studies financed by the manufacturers and released Friday by the New England Journal of Medicine. The oral drugs are sodium zirconium cyclosilicate (also known as ZS-9 and being developed by ZS Pharma) and patriomer (developed by Relypsa). Both drugs treat high potassium by binding to it as they travel through the gut. ...

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Accepting Change: Letting Yourself Fall in the Flow of Your Life

Accepting Change: Letting Yourself Fall in the Flow of Your LifeWhile my current situation is not life-threatening, it has been life-altering. The following are my musings of dealing with a life-changing event.Imagine being in the top physical shape of your life. Years of training, rebooting your body. You changed your food habits, you had adopted exercise habits. You found yourself enjoying working out and...


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Intensive Dutch animal farms seen vulnerable to disease

A man wearing a protective mask and suit inspects a container containing eggs and the bodies of culled chickens at a poultry farm, where a highly contagious strain of bird flu was found by Dutch authorities, in HekendorpBy Thomas Escritt AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Agriculture has helped make the Netherlands rich, but experts warn that the density of farms and the increasing number of animals in one of the most intensive agricultural sectors in the world make it vulnerable to diseases. The discovery last Sunday of a highly infectious strain of bird flu at a Dutch farm forced officials to impose a three-day lockdown on the transport of all poultry and related products. ...


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Portugal Legionnaires' outbreak kills 10, no new infections seen

LISBON (Reuters) - Portugal's largest ever outbreak of Legionnaires' disease has killed 10 people since erupting two weeks ago and 38 are still in intensive care, the health ministry said on Friday, but the risk of contracting the illness is now practically zero. The authorities have traced the source of the Legionella bacteria that infected a total of 336 people - making it one of the world's largest ever outbreaks - back to industrial cooling towers at the Vila Franca de Xira area just northeast of Lisbon. Most of those infected lived or worked in the area. ...

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Study finds HIV drugs could help stop vision loss

Study finds HIV drugs could help stop vision lossDrugs used to treat the HIV virus and AIDS could be used to fight against vision loss, a US university study said Thursday.


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Ebola death toll rises to 5,459; Cuban doctor 'stable'

A man walks by a mural with health instructions on treating the Ebola virus, in MonroviaGENEVA (Reuters) - The death toll in the Ebola epidemic has risen to 5,459 out of 15,351 cases identified in eight countries by the end of Nov. 18, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. The figures showed an increase of 39 recorded deaths and 106 new cases since those issued on Wednesday. "Transmission remains intense in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone," the WHO said, referring to the three hardest-hit West African countries that account for all but 15 of the deaths. ...


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House Republicans sue over Obama's healthcare law

Park of Cambridge wears cast for her broken wrist with "I Love Obamacare" written upon it prior to U.S. President Barack Obama's arrival to speak about health insurance at Faneuil Hall in BostonBy Amanda Becker WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives on Friday filed a long-anticipated lawsuit challenging the implementation of President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law over employer-based coverage and payments to insurers, according to court documents. The lawsuit, filed in a federal court in Washington against the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Treasury, targets a decision to delay implementation of the law's employer mandate, which requires employers with more than 50 employees to offer healthcare coverage. ...


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Banking culture breeds dishonesty, scientific study finds

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - - A banking culture that implicitly puts financial gain above all else fuels greed and dishonesty and makes bankers more likely to cheat, according to the findings of a scientific study. Researchers in Switzerland studied bank workers and other professionals in experiments in which they won more money if they cheated, and found that bankers were more dishonest when they were made particularly aware of their professional role. ...

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Italy arrests doctors suspected of taking bribes to discourage breast feeding

By Steve Scherer ROME (Reuters) - Italian police put 12 pediatricians under house arrest on Friday for allegedly accepting extravagant gifts from makers of baby milk formula to promote it in place of breastfeeding. Police have been investigating "a common and widespread practice" in which pediatricians "prescribe baby milk formula to newborns in exchange for bribes in the form of luxury gifts and costly holidays", a statement said. Two of the doctors put under arrest were chief pediatricians in hospitals, the statement said. ...

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Young climbers injured as often as kids in other sports

By Janice Neumann (Reuters Health) - Rock-climbing teens suffer about as many injuries as young ice hockey or soccer players, most often straining or spraining their hands and fingers and developing tendonitis, says a new study from Canada. The risks, the study authors say, are as high as 4.44 injuries per 1,000 hours of climbing. More work is needed to explore what’s leading to the mishaps and how to prevent them, the researchers write in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. ...

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The Perfect Diet

The Perfect DietKeeping up with all the diet advice out there is a tough job. It's even tough for me, a registered dietitian. If we listened to all the doctors, news, magazines, friends and family we are left with nothing but confusion about what to eat. Things that we have felt solid about for years -- like milk being good for our bones, or non-calorie...






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