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WHO says Ebola vaccine plans accelerating as trials advance

Kieny WHO assistant Director General gestures during news conference on Ebola candidate vaccines in GenevaBy Stephanie Nebehay and Kate Kelland GENEVA/LONDON (Reuters) - Trials of Ebola vaccines could begin in West Africa in December, a month earlier than expected, and hundreds of thousands of doses should be available for use by the middle of next year, the World Health Organization said on Friday. Vaccines are being developed and made ready in record time by drugmakers working with regulators, the U.N. health agency said, but questions remain about their safety and efficacy which can only be settled by full clinical trials. ...


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Wall St. rises on earnings; on track to snap four-week drop

A woman carries an umbrella as she passes by the New York Stock Exchange on Broad St. in New York's financial district during the morning rushBy Chuck Mikolajczak NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. stocks advanced on Friday, as earnings from Microsoft and Procter & Gamble and easing concerns over the possible spread of Ebola in the United States helped put the S&P on track to snap a four-week losing skid. Microsoft was up 2 percent at $45.91, after it reported higher-than-expected quarterly revenue while keeping its profit margins largely intact. Fellow Dow component Procter & Gamble gained 2.7 percent to $85. ...


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Federal officials: Dallas nurse leaves hospital

Patient Nina Pham is hugged by Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, outside of National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. Pham, the first nurse diagnosed with Ebola after treating an infected man at a Dallas hospital is free of the virus. The 26-year-old Pham arrived last week at the NIH Clinical Center. She had been flown there from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — A nurse who caught Ebola while caring for the patient diagnosed in Dallas was released from a hospital Friday, free of the virus.


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As Ebola hits, New Yorkers maintain wary calm

Commuters depart an L train during the morning commute a day after an announcement that the subway system had been used by a doctor now testing positive for Ebola in New YorkBy Edward McAllister NEW YORK (Reuters) - News of New York's first case of Ebola was met with worry and even anger on Friday, but for this city of eight million residents, seasoned by everything from terror attacks to superstorms, there was no sign of panic. Dr. Craig Spencer, 33, who treated Ebola patients in West Africa, was moved with elaborate precautions from his Harlem apartment to Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan with a fever and tested positive for Ebola on Thursday, sparking concern about the spread of the disease in the country's most populous city. ...


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Republicans take aim at U.S. Ebola response as fourth case emerges

Witnesses are sworn in before testifying at the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on the Ebola virus in WashingtonBy David Morgan and Toni Clarke WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama's response to Ebola ran into fresh criticism from Republicans in Congress on Friday, as the emergence of a fourth U.S. case in New York City heightened public anxiety about the potential spread of the virus. Darrell Issa, the California Republican who chairs the House Oversight Committee, blasted what he described as a "bumbling" administration response characterized by missteps and ill-considered procedures to protect U.S. healthcare workers at home and troops in West Africa. ...


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Republicans question federal response on Ebola

Aaron Yah, center, makes comments to reporters as he stands with Saymandy Lloyd, left, and Youngor Jallah during a protest outside of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in Dallas. Jallah, daughter of Louise Troh who was Thomas Eric Duncan's fiance listens as Yah comments on the care Duncan received from the hospital before passing away from complications of the Ebola virus. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)WASHINGTON (AP) — The new Ebola infection in New York City exposed flaws in the system and raised new concerns, lawmakers said Friday, as they criticized the federal response to the outbreak and questioned top officials' credibility.


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Doctor with Ebola in NY hospital, nurse declared virus-free

An exterior view of Bellevue Hospital in New York CityBy Ellen Wulfhorst and Sebastien Malo NEW YORK (Reuters) - A doctor who worked in West Africa with Ebola patients was in an isolation unit in New York City on Friday after testing positive for the virus, becoming the fourth person diagnosed with the disease in the United States and the first in its largest city. Dr. Craig Spencer, 33, was quarantined at Bellevue Hospital on Thursday, six days after returning from Guinea, unnerving financial markets amid concern the virus may spread in the city. The three previous cases were in Dallas. ...


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Nurse Nina Pham Ebola Free, Glad to Go Home to Her Dog

Nurse Nina Pham has been declared Ebola-free.

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Saturday Night Live interns settle NBCUniversal wage lawsuit

By Jonathan Stempel NEW YORK (Reuters) - Thousands of former interns at NBCUniversal, including on the late-night TV show "Saturday Night Live," have reached a $6.4 million settlement of a class-action lawsuit claiming they should have been paid for their work. The settlement resolves claims that NBCUniversal, a unit of Comcast Corp, violated the federal Fair Labor Standards Act and state laws in New York, California and Connecticut by classifying the plaintiffs improperly as "non-employee interns," exempt from applicable wage and hour requirements. "It was probably a good idea for NBCUniversal to settle," said Marcia McCormick, an employment law professor at Saint Louis University School of Law. "NBCUniversal ran the risk that its decision not to pay interns might be viewed by a court as willful, which could result in much higher damages." NBCUniversal denied wrongdoing in agreeing to settle.

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Factbox: Ebola cases in the United States

(Reuters) - Nine cases of Ebola have been seen in the United States since the beginning of August. A Liberian man who died Oct. 8 in a Dallas hospital was the first person diagnosed with the virus on U.S. soil. The latest case is a doctor in New York City who was diagnosed on Oct. 23 within a week of returning from treating people in Guinea, one of the three worst-hit West African countries. The following are details of cases of the hemorrhagic fever seen in the United States: NEW YORK DOCTOR Dr. Craig Spencer, 33, returned to the United States on Oct. ...

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Texas nurse Nina Pham cured of Ebola

A video image from Texas Health Resources shows urse Nina Pham on October 16, 2014, at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in DallasAn American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital Friday. The National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, just outside the capital will hold a press conference at 11:30 am (1530 GMT) to discuss the details of Nina Pham's release, a spokeswoman told AFP. Pham was the first US healthcare worker to be infected with Ebola while working inside the United States, after Thomas Eric Duncan was admitted to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas on September 28. Duncan, who is believed to have been infected in his native Liberia before traveling to Texas to visit family, died on October 8.


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Novo Nordisk receives U.S. subpoena related to Danish factory

A Novo Nordisk employee controls a machine at an insulin production line in a plant in KalundborgBy Teis Jensen COPENHAGEN (Reuters) - Denmark's Novo Nordisk, the world's biggest maker of insulin, has received a U.S. subpoena requesting documents relating to potential manufacturing issues at its Kalundborg plant in Denmark, the company said on Friday. The Kalundborg factory 100 km west of Copenhagen is the world's biggest insulin production site, making half the world's supply. It also produces another kind of non-insulin diabetes treatment known as GLP-1 medicine. The company said the request came from the office of the U.S. ...


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British boy Ashya headed for Spain after cancer therapy

Naghmeh King leaves hospital with her son Ashya after his treatment for a brain tumor, on October 24, 2014 in PragueFive-year-old British brain tumour patient Ashya King is feeling better after 30 sessions of proton therapy in Prague and is heading back to Spain, his doctor said Friday. Sitting in a wheelchair, clutching a silver toy Porsche 911, Ashya waved to reporters outside the Czech capital's Proton Therapy Centre on Friday before being taken by ambulance to another Prague hospital where he is staying. "His condition improved during the therapy and now he can eat on his own, he can sit up, play, respond to questions, laugh, (and) take a few steps," said Jiri Kubes, head physician at the centre, which accepted Ashya in a frail state in September.


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NYC tries to ease Ebola fear after doctor infected

FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2014, file photo, Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune, left, and Teressa Celia, Associate Director of Infection Prevention and Control, pose in protective suits in an isolation room, in the Emergency Room of the hospital, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients in New York. A doctor who recently returned to New York City from West Africa is being tested for the Ebola virus. The doctor had a fever and gastrointestinal symptoms and was taken Thursday to Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)NEW YORK (AP) — Officials tried to tamp down New Yorkers' fears Friday after a doctor was diagnosed with Ebola in a city where millions of people squeeze into crowded subways, buses and elevators every day.


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Ebola could kill 90,000 in Liberia by year-end unless efforts scaled up: study

A man walks by a sign that reads "Ebola is real" in MonroviaBy Magdalena Mis LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Efforts to control the Ebola virus in Liberia must be quickly and dramatically scaled up or tens of thousands of people will die in the coming months, said a study published on Friday. Nearly 4,900 deaths have been recorded across West Africa since the virus was first detected in Guinea in March, according to the World Health Organization. Liberia has been the hardest hit of the countries most affected by the virus, with 2,705 deaths and 4,665 recorded cases. ...


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New York on alert over first Ebola case

A New York City Department of Health and Hospitals Police (NYHP) officer walks past the entrance to Bellevue Hospital October 23, 2014 where a doctor who recently returned to New York from West Africa is being treated for EbolaNew York went on alert Friday as authorities sought to calm fears among the city's 8.4 million residents after a doctor tested positive for Ebola. Craig Spencer, 33, was rushed to the hospital with fever and gastrointestinal symptoms on Thursday, a week after returning from treating Ebola patients in Guinea with charity Doctors Without Borders. He tested positive for the disease, which has killed nearly 4,900 people in West Africa, at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital Center and has been placed in isolation in intensive care. "The last word on the patient this morning is he continues to be stable," New York City health commissioner Mary Bassett told CNN.


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For kids, psychological abuse may leave the deepest scars

By Janice Neumann NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Psychological cruelty to children from parents or caregivers can cause as much - or even more - emotional damage than physical and sexual abuse, according to a new U.S. study. The diagnosis is being overlooked and undertreated compared to physical forms of abuse, researchers say. “When you look at symptom severity, there was no difference between the three forms of maltreatment,” said Joseph Spinazzola, lead author of the study. Psychological trauma is different from “dysfunctional parenting,” where moms or dads periodically lose their tempers. ...

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U.S. nurse who had Ebola is virus free: health officials

Handout of still image from video of Texas nurse Nina Pham in her isolation room at Texas Presbyterian Hospital in DallasWASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola is now free of the virus, U.S. health officials said on Friday. Nina Pham, who contracted the disease while treating a man who later died of Ebola in a Dallas hospital, had been undergoing treatment at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, since Oct. 16. The NIH scheduled a Friday news conference to discuss Pham's discharge. (Writing by Bill Trott; Editing by Jim Loney)


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China to offer $82 million in fourth round of Ebola aid

BEIJING (Reuters) - China said on Friday it would donate 500 million yuan ($82 million) to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea to battle Ebola, its largest round of aid to help contain the spread of the deadly virus. This was the fourth round of Chinese aid against Ebola, the highly infectious hemorrhagic fever that has killed more than 4,800 people since its worst epidemic on record began earlier this year. ...

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Mali isolates nurses amid alarm after first Ebola case

By Tiemoko Diallo and Adama Diarra BAMAKO (Reuters) - Nurses and other people who have come into contact with the first Ebola patient in Mali were isolated on Friday as concerns mounted that an epidemic that has killed 4,900 people in neighbouring West African states could take hold in the country. Mali confirmed its first case of Ebola on Thursday and said the two-year-old girl was being treated in the western town of Kayes. She was brought by relatives from neighbouring Guinea, where the epidemic was detected in March, after her mother died of the disease. ...

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With U.S. Ebola fear running high, African immigrants face ostracism

By Sharon Bernstein (Note: Please be advised that the second paragraph contains language that may be offensive to some readers.) (Reuters) - When Zuru Pewu picked up her 4-year-old son, Micah, from kindergarten at a Staten Island, New York, public school recently, a woman pointed at her in front of about 30 parents and their children, and started shouting. "She kept screaming, 'These African bitches brought Ebola into our country and are making everybody sick!'" said Pewu, 29, who emigrated from Liberia in 2005. "Then she told her son, 'You know the country that's called Liberia that they show on the TV? While many Americans have reached out to help, African communities in the United States are reporting an increasing number of incidents of ostracism.

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Suspicious yellow powder sent to Canadian, Belgian, German, U.S. consulates in Istanbul

A member of the Turkey's disaster management agency disinfects the garden of German Consulate in IstanbulISTANBUL (Reuters) - Packets of an unidentified yellow powder were sent to the Canadian, U.S., Belgian and German consulates in Istanbul on Friday, prompting security alerts following two militant attacks in Canada this week. One Canadian consulate employee came directly into contact with the suspicious package and six others had indirect exposure, Turkey's disaster management agency AFAD said in a statement. Nine people were hospitalized as a precaution. Teams decontaminated the Canadian and Belgium consulates and were working on cleaning the German mission, AFAD spokesman Dogan Eskinat said. ...


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Baxter's blood disorder drug gets FDA approval

(Reuters) - Drugmaker Baxter International Inc said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had approved its drug for treating bleeding episodes in adults with a rare bleeding disorder. The drug, Obizur, has been approved for use in patients with acquired hemophilia A, which usually affects older adults, Baxter said in a statement. The drug will be launched in the United States in the coming months and is being reviewed by European and Canadian regulators, the company said. (Reporting by Shailesh Kuber in Bangalore; Editing by Kirti Pandey)

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The Best Workouts To Do When You're Too Tired To Exercise

Of all the excuses we use when it comes to finding a good reason to skip a workout, "I'm too tired" is probably the most common.Click Here to see the Complete List of Best Workouts To Do When You're Too Tired to ExerciseMaybe that's because it seems the most logical.

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WHO expects around 200,000 Ebola vaccine doses by mid 2015

A medical staff holds a package of an experimental candidate vaccine rVSV-ZEBOV against Ebola virus disease at the University hospital in GenevaBy Stephanie Nebehay and Kate Kelland GENEVA/LONDON (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) set out plans on Friday for speeding up development and deployment of experimental Ebola vaccines, saying hundreds of thousands of doses should be ready for use in West Africa by the middle of 2015. The Geneva-based United Nations health agency confirmed that two leading vaccine candidates are in human clinical trials, and said another five experimental vaccines were also being developed and would begin clinical trials next year. "Before the end of the first half of 2015 ... ...


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Pakistan detects more polio cases on awareness day

ISLAMABAD (AP) — The World Health Organization said Friday that three more polio cases have surfaced in Pakistan, bringing the number of new cases to 220, a record figure that authorities blame on attacks by insurgents targeting vaccination teams.

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EU regulator backs continued use of Ariad Pharma's leukemia drug

(Reuters) - European regulators recommended continued use of Ariad Pharmaceuticals Inc's cancer drug, Iclusig, in its already approved indications to treat certain kinds of leukemia. However, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) recommended additional warnings in Iclusig's European product information to minimize the risk of vascular events, Ariad said. The decision follows a positive recommendation from the EMA's Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee, which said earlier this month that the benefits of Iclusig continued to outweigh its risks. ...

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EU backs drug for rare sun intolerance from Australia's Clinuvel

LONDON (Reuters) - European patients with a rare genetic disease that causes intolerance to sunlight should soon have a new treatment option, following a green light for a drug from Australia's Clinuvel Pharmaceuticals. The biotech company is pinning its hopes on Scenesse, the first medicine for preventing phototoxicity in adults with erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP). After exposure to sunlight, patients with EPP feel a stinging pain in sun-exposed skin and prolonged exposure can lead to an incapacitating pain, often followed by redness and swelling. ...

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Beds at Ebola treatment units empty in Liberia

In this photo taken Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. Grave diggers dug graves to bury Ebola victims at Bong county outskirt of Monrovia, Liberia. Even as Liberians get sick and die of Ebola, many beds in treatment centers are empty because of the government’s order that the bodies of all suspected Ebola victims be cremated. The edict violates Liberians’ values and cultural practices and has so disturbed people that the sick are often being kept at home and, if they die, are being secretly buried, increasing the risk of more infections. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Even as Liberians fall ill and die of Ebola, many beds in treatment centers are empty because of the government's order that the bodies of all suspected Ebola victims in the capital be cremated, authorities have determined.


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AstraZeneca cancer drug pipeline gets boost from European green light

A sign is seen at an AstraZeneca site in MacclesfieldBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - AstraZeneca's cancer drug pipeline received a boost on Friday, as European regulators recommended approval of an experimental medicine against ovarian cancer. The green light from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for olaparib, or Lynparza, is welcome news since the product hit a road bump in June when a U.S. panel voted against its accelerated approval. AstraZeneca has flagged the medicine as a potential $2 billion-a-year seller. Olaparib blocks an enzyme involved in cell repair and is designed for patients with certain hereditary gene mutations. ...


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Call Uber for a…flu shot

Uber conducted a one-day that could bring back doctor house calls.The company that gave the taxi industry a revitalization could bring back doctor house-calls, starting with flu shots.


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Cameron: EU secures $1.25 billion for Ebola fight

British Prime Minister David Cameron walks past journalists on the second day of an EU summit in Brussels, on Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. EU leaders gather for a two-day summit in which they discuss Ebola, climate change and the economy. (AP Photo/Yves Logghe)BRUSSELS (AP) — British Prime Minister David Cameron says that the European Union and its 28 member nations have secured 1 billion euros ($1.25 billion) to fight the Ebola crisis in West Africa.


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WHO sending Ebola experts to Mali, 43 people monitored for virus

Health worker checks the temperature of a baby entering Mali from Guinea at the border in KouremaleGENEVA (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday it was sending more experts to help Mali fight Ebola, a day after the first case of the disease was confirmed there. Malian authorities said on Thursday a two-year-old girl who had traveled to neighboring Guinea was infected -- making Mali the sixth West African country to be touched by the worst outbreak on record of the hemorrhagic fever, which has killed almost 4,900 people. . ...


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Hikma Pharma shares slip on FDA warning for Portugal plant

(Reuters) - Drugmaker Hikma Pharmaceuticals Plc said the U.S. health regulator had raised issues related to environmental monitoring at its plant in Portugal, which some analysts said accounts for about a quarter of the company's U.S. injectibles sales. Shares in the Jordanian company fell more than 6 percent on Friday as the warning added to disappointment of weak branded drug sales and a case filed by Takeda Pharmaceutical Co against the approval of Hikma's drug for gout flares. Hikma's stock was the top percentage loser on the FTSE-250 Midcap Index in the morning. ...

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UK boy finishes proton therapy in Prague for tumor

PRAGUE (AP) — A clinic in Prague says British boy Ashya King has completed his proton beam therapy treatment for a life-threatening brain tumor.

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EU leaders agree to raise Ebola aid budget to 1 bln euros

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - European Union leaders agreed on Friday to roughly double their financial support for efforts to fight the deadly Ebola epidemic in Africa to 1 billion euros, the chairman of their Brussels summit, European Council President Herman Van Rompuy, said. "EU will increase financial help to 1 billion euros to fight Ebola in West Africa," he said in a Twitter messsage. Total contributions from the 28 nations had been running at about 500 million euros ($630 million) and there had been criticism that the wealthy Europeans were not doing more. (1 US dollar = 0.7908 euro)

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EU leaders agree to raise Ebola aid budget to 1 billion euros

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - European Union leaders agreed on Friday to roughly double their financial support for efforts to fight the deadly Ebola epidemic in Africa to 1 billion euros, the chairman of their Brussels summit, European Council President Herman Van Rompuy, said. "EU will increase financial help to 1 billion euros to fight Ebola in West Africa," he said in a Twitter message. Total contributions from the 28 nations had been running at about 500 million euros ($630 million) and there had been criticism that the wealthy Europeans were not doing more. (1 US dollar = 0. ...

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Britons had less gum disease in Roman times than today: study

Britons had less gum disease in Roman times than today: studyBritons had far less gum disease in the Roman era than today, and oral health has seriously worsened despite the advent of toothbrushes and dentists, a study said Friday.


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Australian doctors transplant 'dead' hearts in surgical breakthrough

The revolutionary technique involves donor hearts being transferred to a portable machine where they are placed in a preservation solution, resuscitated and kept warmSydney (AFP) - Australian surgeons said Friday they have used hearts which had stopped beating in successful transplants, in what they said was a world first that could change the way organs are donated.


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Watch: Ohio College Student Diagnosed with Brain Cancer Receives Final Wish

Lauren Hill, 19, will get to play one last game of college basketball with her Mount St Joe's team.





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