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Decades after war, Vietnam and the U.S. battle a legacy of bombs

File photo of U.S. Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Gottemoeller in front of images of U.S. bombs, mines and mortars during visit to bombs and mines education centre in Quang Tri provinceBy Nguyen Ha Minh TRIEU PHONG, Vietnam (Reuters) - Red skull-and-crossbones markers dot the horizon in a barren patch of land in Vietnam where missteps could be fatal. The signs warn of landmines and bombs, the legacy of a war with the United States that claims casualties even today, four decades after hostilities ceased in 1975. Unexploded ordnance (UXO) has since killed 42,000 people and wounded 62,000 in Vietnam, according to official data. Quang Tri province, once the demilitarized zone between the communist North and the Washington-backed democratic South, remains one of the world's most dangerous places.


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Merck-NewLink Ebola vaccine Phase III trial to start March 7

A document is pictured at the opening of a consultation of international experts on potential Ebola therapies and vaccines in GenevaGENEVA/LONDON (Reuters) - Final stage of testing of an experimental Ebola vaccine being developed by Merck and NewLink Genetics will begin in Guinea on March 7, the World Health Organization said on Thursday. Signaling global health authorities' determination to push ahead with vaccine trials despite a sharp drop in cases in the West Africa epidemic, the WHO said a second shot, developed by GlaxoSmithKline will be tested "in a sequential study, as supply becomes available". All three worst-hit countries - Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone - aim to conduct Phase III final-stage clinical trials of experimental vaccines. Liberia is already testing both the GlaxoSmithKline and Merck-NewLink vaccines, while Sierra Leone is expected to announce plans soon.


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Last Ebola patient to be released in Liberia

MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Authorities in Liberia are preparing Thursday to discharge the last Ebola patient in the West African country.

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Special Report: As heroin trade grows, a sting in Kenya

A heroin addict smokes heroin in LamuBy Drazen Jorgic MOMBASA (Reuters) - One evening last November, a handful of policemen in Kenya's sweltering port city of Mombasa were handpicked to help in the final stages of a U.S.-led drugs sting that spanned three continents. The quarry that night were the alleged leaders of the "Akasha organization." The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) had spent years infiltrating Akasha and alleges that the gang is part of a heroin supply chain that stretches from the poppy fields of Afghanistan through east Africa to the cities of Europe and the United States. Inside a mansion girded by palm trees and a two-meter cobblestone wall, police captured the alleged leader of the crime syndicate, Baktash Akasha, his brother Ibrahim, and two other men. Kenyan police charged them with trafficking narcotics to the United States.


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Kenya's home-grown drug problem

(Reuters) - Drug use in Kenya has risen fast in the past few years, according to religious leaders, politicians and charities working to tackle the problem. They say domestic use has soared as international drug cartels have turned east Africa into a major transit route for narcotics from Afghanistan. Juma Ngao, a director at Kenya's National Authority for Campaign against Alcohol and Drug Abuse (NACADA) said the Indian Ocean port towns of Mombasa, Malindi and Lamu have been hardest hit because most drug shipments come by sea. "There is an easy market for drugs on the coast," said Phylis Mwema, who runs a youth rehabilitation organization in Mombasa.

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As heroin trade grows, a sting in Kenya

A heroin addict smokes heroin in LamuBy Drazen Jorgic MOMBASA (Reuters) - One evening last November, a handful of policemen in Kenya's sweltering port city of Mombasa were handpicked to help in the final stages of a U.S.-led drugs sting that spanned three continents. The quarry that night were the alleged leaders of the "Akasha organisation." The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) had spent years infiltrating Akasha and alleges that the gang is part of a heroin supply chain that stretches from the poppy fields of Afghanistan through east Africa to the cities of Europe and the United States. Inside a mansion girded by palm trees and a two-metre cobblestone wall, police captured the alleged leader of the crime syndicate, Baktash Akasha, his brother Ibrahim, and two other men. Kenyan police charged them with trafficking narcotics to the United States.


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WHO to test Ebola vaccine in Guinea, might stop outbreaks

LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says it will soon start large-scale testing of an experimental Ebola vaccine in Guinea to see how effective it might be in preventing future outbreaks of the dreaded virus.

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EU court rules Boston Scientific must pay pacemaker replacement surgery

U.S. medical device maker Boston Scientific Corp's German arm is liable for the cost of operations to replace potentially defective pacemakers, Europe's top court ruled on Thursday. The European Court of Justice ruled that, where a medical device has a potential defect, it is possible to classify as defective all products of the same model. The German company, an importer of Boston Scientific pacemakers and now a subsidiary of the U.S. company, informed physicians in 2005 that a hermetic sealing component might experience gradual degradation, leading to premature battery depletion. The European Court was asked by Germany's Federal Court (Bundesgerichtshof) to rule whether a product should be classified as defective based solely on quality controls showing the risk of a problem without having to determine whether a replaced item itself was in fact flawed.

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No new Ebola cases in Liberia last week: WHO

Patients lie stretchers in the Ebola Kenama treatment centre run by the Red Cross Society on November 15, 2014Ebola-ravaged Liberia has for the first time since last May gone a full week without reporting any new confirmed cases of the devastating virus, according to World Health Organization data. Liberia "reported no new confirmed cases" during the week to March 1, the UN health agency said in a report late Wednesday. Of those, 9,249 cases including 4,117 deaths, were in Liberia, which six months ago was reporting more than 300 new cases each week. Of 45 samples tested nationwide last week, none were positive, WHO said, adding that it was first time there had been no new confirmed cases since May 26, 2014.


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Emirates says has had extensive A380neo discussions

Emirates Airlines planes are parked at the Dubai International Airport during the second day of the Dubai AirshowEmirates [EMIRA.UL] has had extensive discussions with Airbus about the production of a revamped version of the A380 super jumbo with more efficient engines, the airline's president said on Thursday. Emirates, which is the leading buyer of the existing A380 jet with 140 orders, has said it would look at placing an order for up to 200 A380neo jets to replace its current fleet and drive further expansion. "If we're lucky it will give us a 10-13 percent reduction in seat costs per mile," Emirates President Tim Clark told reporters at an event during the ITB travel fair in Berlin. Clark also said Emirates was considering Rolls-Royce engines for 50 of its Airbus A380 aircraft that are yet to be delivered.


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SF hospital performing kidney swap chain involving 12 people

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In a rare series of interlinked operations, six patients are getting kidney transplants from six donors at a San Francisco hospital.

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AbbVie boosts cancer drug pipeline with $21 billion Pharmacyclics deal

A screen displays the share price for pharmaceutical maker AbbVie on the floor of the New York Stock ExchangeThe deal -- the latest example of a big drugmaker swooping on a biotech firm to refill its medicine pipeline -- confounds expectations that Pharmacyclics would sell out to Johnson & Johnson . AbbVie will pay $261.25 per share in cash and stock, a 13 percent premium to Pharmacyclics stock's closing price on Wednesday. AbbVie failed last October to buy Dublin-based Shire Plc for $55 billion after the United States took steps to deter such tax-lowering deals. Deutsche Bank analyst Robyn Karnauskas said the deal was positive for AbbVie as Pharmacyclics' blood cancer treatment Imbruvica would diversify the business beyond Humira.


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Less California pollution spells big gains for children's lungs

Less California pollution spells big gains for children's lungsA study conducted over 20 years in the Los Angeles area showed that the region's improving air quality has led to children having better functioning lungs, researchers said Wednesday. The findings, which tracked 2,000 young people from age 11 to 15, were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The scientists studied three cohorts of different children over two decades, who were asked to blow into a spirometer, which measures lung size and strength. Lung growth was 10 percent greater in the cohort observed between 2007-2011 compared with those in the 1994-1998 group who were breathing a higher level of the harmful pollutant nitrogen dioxide (NO2).


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Bayer says won't get results from Stivarga trial in bowel cancer

German drugmaker Bayer said it would not get any relevant results from a Phase III trial of regorafenib, a drug also known as Stivarga, for the treatment of colorectal cancer, because it failed to recruit a sufficient number of participants. The study in the third and last phase required for regulatory approval was designed to evaluate regorafenib as an additional treatment of colorectal cancer following surgical removal of liver metastases with curative intent. Importantly, there were no new safety signals from the study," Bayer said in a statement. Bayer will continue to evaluate regorafenib in a number of tumor types, including colorectal cancer, it added.

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Fate of Obama health law subsidies rests with 2 justices

Former Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius speaks with reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, March 4, 2015. The Supreme Court heard arguments in King v. Burwell, a major test of President Barack Obama's health overhaul which, if successful, could halt health care premium subsidies in all the states where the federal government runs the insurance marketplaces. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court argument over subsidies that help millions of people afford their health insurance suggests that the Obama administration has two chances to attract one critical vote.


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Health checks by smartphone raise privacy fears

A visitor at the 2015 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, where experts have warned of the dangers of sensitive health data on mobile phone ending up in the wrong handsAuthorities and tech developers must stop sensitive health data entered into applications on mobile phones ending up in the wrong hands, experts warn. "It's an inexorable tide that is causing worries because people are introducing their data into the system themselves, without necessarily reading all the terms and conditions," said Vincent Genet of consultancy Alcimed. The European Commission estimates the market for mobile health services could exceed 17.5 billion euros (19 billion euros) from 2017. Patients are entering health indicators and even using online health services for long-distance consultations with doctors whom they do not know.


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More Ebola in Guinea, Sierra Leone last week, no Liberia cases - WHO

Health workers wearing protective equipment are disinfected outside the Island Clinic in Monrovia, where patients are treated for EbolaGuinea and Sierra Leone reported 132 new confirmed cases of Ebola in the week to March 1, an increase of 34 over the previous week, the World Health Organization said on Wednesday. Liberia did not report any new confirmed infections in the week for the first time since May last year, but disease surveillance may not be optimal given the low number of samples, the U.N. agency said in its latest update on West Africa's epidemic. Only half of the 51 new infections in Guinea came from registered contacts of Ebola patients and some cases are only identified after post-mortem testing, it said. "The number of confirmed Ebola virus disease deaths occurring in the community in Guinea and Sierra Leone remains high, suggesting that the need for early isolation and treatment is not yet understood, accepted or acted upon," the WHO said in a statement.


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After Ebola ban, N. Korea opens marathon to foreigners

TOKYO (AP) — After lifting travel restrictions it imposed because of concerns over the Ebola virus, North Korea says foreigners can now take part in one of its most popular tourist events — the annual Pyongyang marathon, a travel agency said Thursday.

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North Korea to reopen Pyongyang marathon to foreign runners

By James Pearson SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea is set to reopen an international marathon to overseas runners after ending a ban on most foreigners entering the country because of fears over the deadly Ebola virus, tour companies said on Thursday. North Korean officials had previously told travel agencies specializing in tours to the isolated country that foreign runners were no longer allowed to participate in the marathon scheduled for April in the capital, Pyongyang. The country closed its borders to foreign tourists last October for fear the virus might spread and imposed a strict 21-day quarantine on foreign aid workers and diplomats, who were told to stay in embassy compounds. "I spoke to our North Korean partners this morning who said they were in discussions with the marathon committee about reopening the event to foreign runners," Troy Collings, manager of Chinese-based Young Pioneer Tours, told Reuters.

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Safety for Women and Girls: Protection Strategies for a Healthful World

Safety for Women and Girls: Protection Strategies for a Healthful WorldThis International Women's Day, as we step back to marvel at the significant progress made by women and girls worldwide, we take note as well of the distance yet to travel before every woman and girl feels safe in this world -- safe enough simply to go to school, to gather water or firewood, to go to work before dawn. Safe enough that you know...


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Second Los Angeles hospital identifies 'superbug' infections

By Steve Gorman LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A second top Los Angeles hospital has reported an outbreak of drug-resistant "superbug" infections, and dozens more potential exposures, from procedures performed with a fiber-optic instrument called a duodenoscope. The notice from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of four such infections and 67 more patients who were at risk coincided with a hospital in Hartford, Connecticut, reporting a similar outbreak involving at least five infections and more than 280 potential exposures.

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Second Los Angeles hospital reports 'superbug' infections

FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration shows the tip of an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) duodenoscope, attached to a long tube, not shown. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center said on Wednesday, March 4, 2015, that four patients have been infected with a superbug linked to a contaminated medical scope. It’s the second Los Angeles hospital to report infections from a superbug known as CRE. (AP Photo/U.S. Food and Drug Administration, File)LOS ANGELES (AP) — Four patients at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center have been infected with an antibiotic-resistant "superbug" linked to a type of medical scope that's used on more than a half-million people in the U.S. every year, the hospital said Wednesday.


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McDonald's antibiotic-free move could prompt U.S. chicken squeeze

A plan by McDonald's Corp to phase out chicken raised with certain kinds of antibiotics at its 14,000 U.S. restaurants will put additional pressure on an already-stressed supply chain. Antibiotic-free chicken currently accounts for a tiny portion of total U.S. supplies, and an increasing desire on the part of consumers for more "natural" products has meant that demand sometimes exceeds supply. Available product has been so tight that when six of the largest U.S. school districts tried to make the switch to antibiotic-free poultry last year, chicken sellers such as Tyson Foods Inc and Pilgrim's Pride Corp said they could not change their production systems quickly enough to meet the demand. "This is very likely to cause a disruption in McDonald's food supply and will likely raise operating costs for McDonald's franchisees," added Richard Adams, a former McDonald's franchisee who now runs the consulting firm Franchise Equity Group.

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U.S. FDA updates safety alert for 'superbug' scopes

U.S. health regulators issued an updated safety alert on Wednesday for endoscopes linked to drug-resistant "superbug" bacteria in California hospitals. The Food and Drug Administration said it was not recommending that healthcare providers cancel procedures performed with a duodenoscope for patients who need them. It did recommend that healthcare providers inform patients of the risks, including infection, and benefits associated with the procedure and report to the manufacturer and the FDA if they suspect problems with the equipment have led to patient infections. The alert followed news on Wednesday that four patients at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles were infected with a drug-resistant bacteria during endoscopic procedures that may have exposed 64 others since August.

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U.S. Supreme Court split over Obamacare challenge

Members of the King v. Burwell plaintiffs' legal team, including Kazman, Pruitt, Pamela and Douglas Hurst, and Carvin, exit the Supreme Court building after arguments in WashingtonBy Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court appeared sharply divided on ideological lines on Wednesday as it tackled a second major challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare law, with Justice Anthony Kennedy emerging as a likely swing vote in a ruling. The nine justices heard 85 minutes of arguments in the case brought by conservative opponents of the law who contend its tax credits aimed at helping people afford medical insurance should not be available in most states. A ruling favoring the challengers could cripple the law dubbed Obamacare, the president's signature domestic policy achievement. Kennedy, a conservative who often casts the deciding vote in close cases, raised concerns to lawyers on both sides about the possible negative impact on states if the government loses the case, suggesting he could back the Obama administration.


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U.S. high court's Kennedy criticizes challenge to Obamacare subsidies

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Justice Anthony Kennedy, a possible swing vote on a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court, told a lawyer challenging Obamacare subsidies on Wednesday that his argument raised a serious constitutional problem, but said the lawyer might win anyway on other grounds. Justice Anthony Kennedy questioned lawyer Michael Carvin part way into the scheduled one-hour oral argument about how a ruling might unlawfully pressure states in a case that tests President Barack Obama's signature domestic policy achievement. (Reporting by David Ingram; Editing by Will Dunham)

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White House 'pleased' with solicitor's Supreme Court arguments: spokesman

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration was "quite pleased" with its lawyer's arguments on Wednesday before the U.S. Supreme Court defending President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, a White House spokesman said. Spokesman Josh Earnest cautioned against drawing conclusions about how the court will decide the case based on questions during oral arguments. The Supreme Court appeared divided on ideological lines as it heard the challenge to the 2010 law on Wednesday. (Reporting by Emily Stephenson; Editing by Bill Trott)

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Factbox: Obamacare case focuses on tax subsidies, insurance exchanges

(Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear a second major challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare law on Wednesday, focusing on the issue of tax subsidies available through insurance exchanges set up under the statute. Here is a look at the exchanges and subsidies. HEALTH INSURANCE EXCHANGES The Affordable Care Act, often called Obamacare, requires people who do not get health insurance through their employer, or the government programs Medicare and Medicaid to buy their own insurance. To make that easier, it created health insurance exchanges, which are centralized online marketplaces that allow consumers to shop among competing insurance plans.

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U.S. hospitals optimistic they'll dodge bullet with Obamacare ruling

By Caroline Humer and Bill Berkrot NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. hospital executives said on Wednesday they were optimistic they will avoid the toughest consequences of a Supreme Court decision on whether millions of Americans can continue to purchase subsidized health benefits under Obamacare. The high court heard oral arguments in the case challenging the federal tax credits that help residents in at least 34 states afford medical benefits under President Barack Obama's healthcare law. Investors interpreted commentary by Justice Anthony Kennedy, a potential swing vote among the nine judges, as favorable to the Obama administration's defense, boosting hospital shares. Since the subsidies were introduced last year, they have helped hospitals reduce the debt accumulated by covering the costs of uninsured patients.

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Instant View: Supreme Court arguments help hospital shares

Shares in hospitals shot up as the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on a major challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare law that threatens federal tax subsidies for residents of at least 34 states to help buy health insurance. Justice Anthony Kennedy, a conservative on the nine-member court who often casts the deciding vote in close cases, raised concerns to lawyers on both sides about the possible negative impact on states if the government loses the case, suggesting he could back the Obama administration. Quincy Krosby, market strategist at Prudential Financial: "I think that hearing assuaged fears - at least for now - that we were headed for overturning Obamacare."     "Health care has been a favorite sector. Anything that questions that or can be an important negative will hold that back, and so this was a relief for investors in the sector." Brian Tanquilut, hospital sector analyst for Jefferies:     "The investor community thinks four justices are in the bag, so all you need is one.

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Roberts, Obamacare's savior in 2012, seems inscrutable this time

By Joan Biskupic WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts, who cast the decisive vote in 2012 to beat back the first major challenge to President Barack Obama's healthcare law, kept his cards close on Wednesday. As liberal justices pounded Michael Carvin for altering his stance on the necessity of the tax-credit subsidies to Obamacare from his view in the failed 2012 court challenge, Roberts remarked, "Mr. Carvin, we've heard talk about that other case. In 2012, Roberts, a shrewd 60-year-old former corporate lawyer appointed by Republican President George W. Bush, drew the condemnation of fellow conservative justices and much of the right-wing legal community for preserving Obamacare.

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U.S. Supreme Court divided over Obamacare subsidies challenge

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on ideological lines on Wednesday as it weighed tax subsidies key to the implementation of the Obamacare health law. Potential swing vote Justice Anthony Kennedy raised concerns to lawyers on both sides about the possible negative impact on states if the government loses the case, suggesting he could back the Obama administration. But he did not commit to supporting either side. (Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

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When wives take ill, divorce could be on horizon: study

Marriages are more likely to end in divorce if the wife takes seriously ill, a US study has found, in contrast, when husbands fall gravely ill, the likelihood of divorce is unchangedMarriages are more likely to end in divorce if the wife takes seriously ill, a US study has found. The research, detailed in the March issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, found that divorce was six percent more likely if the wife fell ill, than if she remained in good health. In contrast, when husbands fell gravely ill, the likelihood of divorce was unchanged, the researchers found. In the end, 32 percent ended in divorce while 24 percent led to one of the partners becoming a widow or widower, the research found.


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China premier vows to fight pollution, corruption

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said on Thursday his government would do everything it could to fight pollution and pledged zero tolerance for corruption, two highly sensitive topics that have become lightning rods for public discontent. Li, speaking at the opening of the annual full session of the National People's Congress, the country's largely rubber-stamp parliament, called pollution a "blight on people's quality of life and a trouble that weighs on their hearts". On corruption, a deep-seated problem President Xi Jinping has vowed to fight, Li said the battle would not end. We will see to it that every instance of corruption, should it be committed higher up or lower down, is severely punished," he said.

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Gout may lessen Alzheimer risk

The same uric acid that can crystallise to cause gout, a form of arthritis, may protect against Alzheimer's, researchers sayPeople who suffer from gout can take comfort in one thing: they may be less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, researchers said Wednesday. The same uric acid that can crystallise to cause gout, a form of arthritis, may protect against Alzheimer's, they wrote in the online journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. Testing a theory that antioxidant properties in uric acid may protect the brain, experts from the United States and Canada looked at the records of 3.7 million people over the age of 40 in a British database of medical charts. Researchers compared data on people with gout, and those without, who developed Alzheimer's disease in a followup period of about five years.


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U.S. ambassador to South Korea attacked during speech

The U.S. State Department said the American ambassador to South Korea, Mark Lippert, was injured in an assault during a breakfast speech in Seoul but that his injuries were not life threatening. "We strongly condemn this act of violence," State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said, adding Lippert was being treated at a hospital. President Barack Obama called Lippert to wish him a speedy recovery, White House National Security Council spokeswoman Bernadette Meehan said.

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Former player Nate Jackson calls for NFL to allow marijuana

Former Denver Bronco Nate Jackson speaks during a cannabis industry expo in Denver, Wednesday, March 4, 2015. Jackson and some other former NFL players are calling on the league to allow medical marijuana as a means to help players deal with the physical pain inherent in their profession. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)DENVER (AP) — Former Broncos tight end Nate Jackson says he believes the NFL will have no choice but to remove marijuana from its lists of banned substances in the near future.


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Crowdfunding psychedelics: LSD brain-imaging study seeks funds

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - British scientists are turning to crowdfunding to complete the first scientific study ever to image the brain of someone "tripping" on the psychedelic drug LSD. The study, part of a psychedelic research project the scientists say could revolutionize understanding of the human brain, is led by neuroscientists at Imperial College London who now need around 25,000 pounds ($38,000) to finish their work. When they do, the research will produce the world's first images of the human brain on LSD and will begin to reveal the way the drug can work to heal many debilitating illnesses such as alcohol addiction, depression and anxiety, the scientists told a briefing in London. "Despite the incredible potential of this drug to further out understanding of the brain, political stigma has silenced research," said David Nutt, a psychiatrist and professor of psychopharmacology at Imperial College London.

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Monkeys infected by deadly bacteria at Louisiana lab

(Reuters) - Five monkeys at a high-security primate research lab in Louisiana were accidentally infected with or exposed to a deadly bacteria being analyzed at the lab, officials told Reuters on Wednesday. A federal investigator also became sick a day after entering the Tulane National Primate Research Center near New Orleans in January and tested positive for the bacteria, Burkholderia pseudomallei, but it was unclear whether she had been exposed to the bacteria at the center or before her visit, said Tulane spokesman Mike Strecker. The rhesus macaque monkeys had been housed in the veterinary clinic of the center, which is about 40 miles (65 km) north of New Orleans. Research on the bacteria, which was being done to find a vaccine, has been halted while the incident is being investigated, Strecker said.

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J&J nearing deal to buy cancer drug maker Pharmacyclics: FT

Products made by Johnson & Johnson for sale on a store shelf in WestminsterJohnson & Johnson is close to buying cancer drug maker Pharmacyclics Inc in the coming days, the Financial Times reported, citing sources. A bid from J&J is expected to value Pharmacyclics near its $17.5 billion market value or at a premium, FT said on Wednesday, citing people familiar with the matter. Shares of Pharmacyclics, which markets blood cancer drug Imbruvica with J&J's Janssen unit, rose about 3 percent in extended trading. Sales of Imbruvica, which has U.S. approvals for four forms of blood cancer, are expected to touch $1 billion in the United States this year, Pharmacyclics has said earlier.






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