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Spanish judge orders release of ill boy's parents

This is an undated handout photos issued by England's Hampshire Police on Monday Sept. 1, 2014, of Brett King and Naghemeh King, the parents of Ashya King, who have legal proceedings against them continuing in Spain after they took the five-year-old brain cancer patient out of hospital without doctors' consent. Critically-ill 5-year-old boy Ashya King driven to Spain by his parents is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday Aug. 31 2014. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Hampshire Police)SOTO DEL REAL, Spain (AP) — Spanish officials have ordered the immediate release of a detained British couple who were wanted by police in the United Kingdom after they took their critically ill child for treatment abroad without doctors' consent.


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Citing security threat, Obama expands U.S. role fighting Ebola

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in AtlantaBy Jeff Mason and James Harding Giahyue ATLANTA/MONROVIA (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Tuesday called West Africa's deadly Ebola outbreak a looming threat to global security and announced a major expansion of the U.S. role in trying to halt its spread, including deployment of 3,000 troops to the region. "The reality is that this epidemic is going to get worse before it gets better," Obama said at the Atlanta headquarters of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "But, right now, the world still has an opportunity to save countless lives. ...


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Obama's Ebola response: Is it enough and in time?

President Barack Obama speaks at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. Obama traveled to the CDC, to address the Ebola crisis and announced that he is sending 3,000 American troops to West Africa nations fight the spread of the Ebola epidemic. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama declared Tuesday that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa could threaten security around the world, and he ordered 3,000 U.S. military personnel to the region in emergency aid muscle for a crisis spiraling out of control.


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Doctor pleads guilty to cancer treatment fraud

DETROIT (AP) — A Detroit-area cancer doctor accused of putting people through unnecessary treatments and then billing insurers for millions of dollars pleaded guilty to fraud Tuesday, admitting that he knew his patients often didn't need chemotherapy.

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U.S. leaders call for 'war' on Ebola outbreak, pledge troops

Speaker of the House John Boehner speaks to the media on Capitol Hill in WashingtonBy Jeff Mason ATLANTA (Reuters) - U.S. lawmakers called for a government-funded "war" to contain West Africa's deadly Ebola epidemic before it threatens more countries, building on an American pledge to send 3,000 military engineers and medical personnel to combat the virus. Democratic and Republican lawmakers pledged increased support for efforts to contain the virus that has killed nearly 2,500 people out of almost 5,000 cases in West Africa. ...


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Watch: Ebola Survivor Dr. Kent Brantly Urges Action From Congress

U.S. government is planning new aid to Ebola-ravaged West Africa.

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Watch: Ebola Survivor Dr. Kent Brantly Demands Action from Congress

Federal Government is planning new aid to Ebola-ravaged West Africa.

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American waistlines get bigger and bigger

The average American's waistline has expanded over the past decade, adding about one inch of belly fat among the general public from 1999 to 2012, researchers said, with men gaining on average 0.8 inches and women 1.5 inchesWashington (AFP) - The average American's waistline has expanded over the past decade, adding about one inch (2.5 centimeters) of belly fat among the general public from 1999 to 2012, researchers said Tuesday.


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5 Ways You Change When You Hang Out With Dr. Oz

5 Ways You Change When You Hang Out With Dr. OzEvery job change comes with lifestyle changes: You adjust to a different commute, switch your coffee place, maybe spiff up your wardrobe (a handbag upgrade is always in order, am I right?). But when you begin to work for Dr. Mehmet Oz, world-famous cardiothoracic surgeon and healthy lifestyle guru, the changes you make are a little out of the...


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Why Do You Eat the Food You Eat?

Why Do You Eat the Food You Eat?What we eat and don't eat is largely a result of what group we belong to," according to an article titled Food and Ethnic Identity, by Robert A. Leonard Ph.D. and Wendy J. Saliba, MA,MBA.I met Dr. Leonard when we sat next to each other at a dinner at Hofstra University for the instructors of the Hofstra Continuing Education (CE) program....


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Urine test for cervical cancer virus offers alternative to smear

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A simple urine test for the virus that causes cervical cancer could offer a less invasive and more acceptable alternative to the conventional cervical smear test, researchers said on Tuesday. In a study comparing the accuracy of urine sample testing with smear testing conducted by a doctor, scientists from Britain and Spain found the results were good and said using the urine test to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) could lead to more women agreeing to be screened. ...

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Watch: Ebola Experts Testify Before Senate Panel

Senate hears testimony as the White House announces plan to aid in fight against deadly virus in West Africa.

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U.S. lawmakers want to curb antibiotic use on farms

Nine-day-old chicks gather at a Foster Farms chicken ranch near TurlockBy Brian Grow and P.J. Huffstutter (Reuters) - Two U.S. lawmakers are calling for action to rein in antibiotic use in livestock in response to a Reuters investigation showing how top U.S. poultry firms have been administering drugs to their flocks. U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, (D-NY), said she plans to introduce new legislation authorizing the Food and Drug Administration to collect data on “farm-level antibiotic use.” The pledge was part of a letter Gillibrand sent Tuesday to FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg. ...


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Probe: HealthCare.gov website must boost security

This Monday, Sept. 15, 2014, photo shows part of the HealthCare,gov website in Washington. Nonpartisan congressional investigators say the website has significant security weaknesses that could put Americans' personal information at risk. The Government Accountability Office said Tuesday, Sept. 16, that the Obama administration must resolve more than 20 specific security issues related to who can get into the online system, who can make changes in it and what to do in case the complex network fails.(AP Photo/Jon Elswick)WASHINGTON (AP) — HealthCare.gov, the health insurance website serving more than 5 million Americans, has significant security flaws that put users' personal information at risk, nonpartisan congressional investigators have concluded.


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Dispute could delay Florida rollout of limited medical marijuana

A jar of medical marijuana is displayed at the medical marijuana farmers market in Los AngelesBy Zachary Fagenson MIAMI (Reuters) - Florida patients with epilepsy and other diseases hoping to gain limited access to medical marijuana may have to keep waiting as the state's largest nursery is contesting newly developed rules needed to roll out a special strain of cannabis. Miami-based Costa Farms filed a legal challenge on Monday to the rules developed by the Florida Department of Health for implementing a new state law permitting the strain of marijuana known as "Charlotte's Web. ...


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Legionnaire's disease kills two in Spain

A petri dish and test tubes with colonies of legionella bacteria, which can cause the lung infection Legionnaire's diseaseBarcelona (AFP) - Two people have died and 20 others have fallen ill in an outbreak of the lung infection Legionnaire's disease in northeastern Spain, regional health authorities said Tuesday.


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Severe respiratory illness confirmed in 12 states

NEW YORK (AP) — Health officials say 12 states now have respiratory illnesses caused by an uncommon virus — enterovirus 68.

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Coke, J&J join big companies behind new employee wellness push

A bottle of Coca-Cola is shown in this photo illustration in Encinitas, CaliforniaBy Toni Clarke WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Leaders of some of the biggest U.S. corporations, from Coca-Cola Co to Johnson & Johnson , unveiled a campaign on Tuesday to reduce the nation's healthcare costs, urging their peers to embrace wellness programs to improve employee health. The newly-formed group, called The CEO Council on Health and Innovation, said it came together "to lead the U.S. business community" in improving employee and community health and reducing costs. ...


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CDC study: Americans' bellies are expanding fast

FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014, file photo, an overweight man rests on a bench in Jackson, Miss. Rising numbers of American adults have the most dangerous kind of obesity, belly fat, despite evidence that overall obesity rates may have plateaued, government data shows. Abdominal obesity affects 54 percent of U.S. adults, versus 46 percent in 1999-2000, and the average waist size crept up an inch, too, according to the most recent statistics. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)CHICAGO (AP) — The number of American men and women with big-bellied, apple-shaped figures — the most dangerous kind of obesity — has climbed at a startling rate over the past decade, according to a government study.


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The obstacle to treating China's contaminated soil is finding someone to pay

A rail track which was used to transport steel is pictured outside a former main steel mill of the Shougang Group, at Mentougou District in BeijingBy David Stanway BEIJING (Reuters) - Nearly four years after a massive state-run steel mill on the outskirts of Beijing was closed to help cut smog in the Chinese capital, little has been done to clean up the contaminated site. The factory's idled chimneys dominate a landscape of rust-encased piping and rail tracks that once fed 8 million tonnes of steel into China's economy each year. The 95-year-old former mill, owned by Shougang Group, China's fifth biggest steel producer, is one of thousands of sites across China where soil has been polluted by industrial and agricultural waste. ...


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American waistlines still expanding, study says

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The average waistline of Americans increased by more than an inch over the past decade, according to a study from U.S. health researchers. Along with the increase in waist circumference measurements, the number of Americans with abdominal obesity increased by about eight percentage points between 1999-2000 and 2011-2012, researchers from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found. "We’ve been doing these studies for a number of years now," said Dr. Earl Ford, the study's lead author. "We’ve had three previous publications. ...

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Opera singer backs drive to help 10 million 'ghost' people

US singer Barbara Hendricks and The Magnus Lindgren Quartet performs in BurgosBy Emma Batha THE HAGUE The Netherlands (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Opera singer Barbara Hendricks lent her voice on Tuesday to a global campaign to end statelessness, calling for an end to the suffering of 10 million "ghost" people. The U.S.-born soprano said she had been moved to tears by the stories told by former stateless people on the second day of the world's first international forum on statelessness. Hendricks said it was important for everyone to belong somewhere and that no one should be "walking around like a ghost". ...


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UN: Nearly $1 billion needed now to stop Ebola

Health workers in protective gear move the body of a person that they suspect dyed form the Ebola virus in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The number of Ebola cases in West Africa could start doubling every three weeks and it could end up costing nearly $1 billion to contain the crisis, the World Health Organization warned Tuesday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)GENEVA (AP) — The number of Ebola cases could start doubling every three weeks in West Africa, the World Health Organization said Tuesday, warning that the outbreak will cost nearly $1 billion to contain so it does not turn into a "human catastrophe."


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Wall St. climbs as expectations shift on Fed policy

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock ExchangeBy Chuck Mikolajczak NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. stocks rose on Tuesday and the S&P notched its best performance in a month after a report shifted investor expectations for the Federal Reserve's policy statement due on Wednesday. After a sluggish start to trading, major indexes rallied with participants citing a report in the Wall Street Journal as indicating the Fed could be less hawkish than markets have been expecting, as investors try to divine when the central bank will hike interest rates. ...


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Child mortality drops in 2013: UN

The child mortality rate around the world has dropped by nearly half since 1990, the United Nations said--last year, more than six million children died before reaching the age of five, around 200,000 fewer than the year beforeUnited Nations (United States) (AFP) - The child mortality rate around the world has dropped by nearly half since 1990, the United Nations said Tuesday in its latest report showing a new decrease in 2013.


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Post-immunization epilepsy likely not related to vaccine: study

By Anne Harding NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Children who start having seizures soon after a vaccination and go on to develop epilepsy usually turn out to have an underlying cause of the seizure disorder, according to a new study published in Pediatrics. "It's reassuring to hear that with follow-up testing, the vast majority of these cases can be identified as coming from a different cause," Dr. Shannon MacDonald told Reuters Health. ...

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Georgia man sentenced to 20 years in 2013 school shooting

By David Beasley ATLANTA (Reuters) - A man who fired an AK-47 in a suburban Atlanta elementary school in 2013 before a school clerk convinced him to put his gun down and turn himself in pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison on Tuesday. Michael Brandon Hill, 21, pleaded guilty to aggravated assault and other charges and received a 40-year sentence, half of which he will be able to serve on probation, his attorney said. Hill, who had long suffered from mental illness, was trying to commit suicide by prompting police to shoot him, said Annie Deets, his attorney. ...

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Obama says Africa Ebola epidemic 'spiraling out of control'

U.S. President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in AtlantaATLANTA (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama said on Tuesday that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is "spiraling out of control" and exhorted the global community to move faster and contribute more help to contain the spread of the deadly disease. "Here's the hard truth. In West Africa, Ebola is now an epidemic, the likes that we have not seen before. It's spiraling out of control, it's getting worse," Obama said after meeting with top U.S. public health officials. (Reporting by Jeff Mason, Roberta Rampton, Steve Holland; Editing by Sandra Maler)


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Find Your 'Why' and Work It Out

Find Your 'Why' and Work It OutSome mornings I'm really good about working out and others -- eh.. not so good. As a creative person, I get bored easily. I jog, walk, do Pilates, paddle board; anything to keep it interesting. Yet I don't do any of these things ENOUGH. My average is about twice a week, two to three weeks out of the month. I'm not consistent and typically feel...


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Belgium grants jailed rapist, murderer euthanasia

BrusselsBRUSSELS (AP) — A Belgian convicted of murder and rape who has been imprisoned for almost three decades has been granted the right to die after doctors agreed his psychological condition was incurable, an official said Tuesday.


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67 South Africans died in Lagos church collapse: Zuma

LAGOS (Reuters) - Sixty-seven South Africans died and scores were injured in the collapse of a building in the compound of a Lagos Pentecostal church last week, South Africa's President Jacob Zuma said on Tuesday. The guest house, under construction in the compound belonging to the Synagogue Church of All Nations, headed by "Prophet" T.B. Joshua, collapsed on Friday while three extra stories were being added to its existing two floors. Local emergency services put the total number killed in the collapse in the Ikotun neighbourhood of Lagos at 61 on Tuesday. ...

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Watch: Experts Weigh in on the Progress of Cancer Research

Dr. Richard Besser is joined by a panel of experts to discuss the AACR Cancer Progress report.

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Ebola vaccine trial finds 'no red flags': U.S. Senate testimony

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A key safety trial of an experimental Ebola vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline has injected 10 healthy volunteers since Sept. 2, Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases told a U.S. Senate panel on Tuesday, and so far "no red flags" indicating serious adverse reactions have been found. An additional 10 volunteers will receive the vaccine in coming days. The trial is being conducted at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Results are expected by the end of this year. ...

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New data shows Americans' incomes still stagnant after recession

A woman counts her U.S. dollar bills at a money changer in JakartaBy Jason Lange WASHINGTON (Reuters) - In what has become a recurring theme in America's long slog back from the 2007-09 recession, most U.S. households again saw no noticeable increase in their income last year. A report from the Census Bureau on Tuesday showed the country's median household income edged up just $180 last year to $51,939, a gain deemed statistically insignificant. Income at the median, meaning half the country earned more and half earned less, has declined nearly $5,000 since 2007 when the nation fell into a deep downturn. ...


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Syrian opposition halts vaccinations after death reports

A Syrian refugee child receives a vaccination on April 11, 2014 at a refugee camp near the Lebanese village of Zahle in the Bekaa valleyBeirut (AFP) - The Syrian opposition said Tuesday it halted a measles vaccination campaign in the northeastern Idlib province following reports children had died after being innoculated.


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Allergan reaches truce with suitors on special shareholder meeting

businesAllergan CEO Pyott speaks during an interview in New York(Reuters) - Allergan Inc has agreed not to throw up any roadblocks to a special shareholder meeting on Dec. 18, giving Pershing Square Capital Management a chance to attempt its threatened replacement of Allergan board members. The battling parties late on Monday settled their pending litigation before the Delaware Court of Chancery and agreed to a special shareholder meeting on the originally scheduled date. ...


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Fewer hospitalizations for diabetic veterans using VA’s home-based care

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For older U.S. military veterans with multiple chronic conditions, including diabetes, taking advantage of home-based primary care from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) was linked to fewer hospitalizations, in a recent study. Some VA medical centers in the U.S. offer home-based primary care, in which a physician supervises a health care team that provides services in the veteran’s home, rather than through regular clinic visits. ...

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U.N. Security Council eyes action to heighten Ebola response

The United Nations logo is displayed on a door at U.N. headquarters in New YorkBy Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United Nations Security Council could adopt a resolution later this week to expand the global response to the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa by calling on countries to lift travel restrictions and provide urgent assistance, including field hospitals and staff. The draft U.N. resolution on Ebola, circulated to council members and obtained by Reuters, calls on U.N. member states, particularly in the region, "to lift general travel and border restrictions ... ...


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Weight loss on antipsychotics is possible: study

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The drugs people take to help ease serious mental illnesses often contribute to weight and blood sugar problems - but researchers say a lifestyle intervention can be helpful on both fronts. The so-called “antipsychotic drugs” that patients take to control their symptoms tend to stimulate hunger and thirst and cause metabolic changes. But in a new test of a year-long intervention, people taking these drugs for illnesses like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder were able to lose weight and improve their blood sugar levels. ...

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World Bank approves $105 million Ebola grant for West Africa

A billboard displaying a government message about Ebola is seen on a street in AbidjanBy Stella Dawson WASHINGTON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The World Bank approved a $105 million grant on Tuesday to speed up delivery of emergency supplies and provide support for healthcare workers in the three West African countries worst affected by the Ebola crisis. The disease has swamped weak health systems, infecting hundreds of local staff in a region chronically short of doctors and nurses and in some areas is raging out of control. Getting more healthcare workers onto the frontlines is seen as critical to controlling the deadly virus. ...






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